Chinook RV Forum

It is currently November 23rd, 2017, 1:17 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 123 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: 110 Volt Fridge
PostPosted: August 23rd, 2017, 5:02 pm 
Offline

Joined: August 8th, 2015, 11:54 am
Posts: 207
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Blue - I'll have to track down your friend with the rock hard ice cream!

Meanwhile, checked the unit just a while ago - freezer is at 12 degrees and fridge is at 34 degrees. Control knob is slightly above 3 now so its encouraging. However, the sun didn't peak out until late this afternoon so I still need to "road test" it to be sure.

On insulation, I have a question. I know I can get Styrofoam on either side and on top of the unit, but for under the unit and to line the outside wall I was thinking of using Dynamat. Its thin and would also help with the generator noise but I want to make sure its equal to or better than Styrofoam. What do you think?

_________________
Paul Demarest
2003 Premier V-10


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
background-color: #C1CAD2
 

 Post subject: Re: 110 Volt Fridge
PostPosted: August 23rd, 2017, 8:29 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: July 31st, 2014, 1:01 am
Posts: 1914
Location: 1999 Concourse
I don't know that Dynamat would be as good, R-value wise. But then too, there are different products. I'm a little rusty since I researched/bought products over a year ago, but what I remember is this:

1) Base layer that doesn't have to cover more than X percentage of, say, the generator box. This is the thin stuff that is kind of like very thin rubber with a foil backing on top and adhesive underneath. I think the purpose of this is to stop resonance (like you hit thin metal and it sounds like a drum, but once you put a certain percentage of this on, it's dampened.

2) MLV (mass loaded vinyl, I think). This you want t have full coverage on, and even tape any seams. I can't remember exactly what this does, but I think more noise reduction. I suppose it does something for heat, but maybe not that much?

Second Skin, where I bought the above two products, recommended these for the generator box.

3) I also (later) got a "hoodliner" product (put it on inside of buddy's V10 doghouse; will likely do mine). This was for heat and noise, but again, not sure it'd be the best choice for JUST non-fire-like heat and no noise reduction needed (like outside refrigerator wall). This is thicker, so might take up more valuable space than necessary on generator box (vs. MLV? Not sure, but maybe that's why I went with #1 and #2 for generator box...).

4) But for insulation on an area that is not flat and where it has to be thin, I think I might go with (or at least consider) an Armacell product. This is often used on boats (inside the hull). It's a flexible closed cell foam, and I think the emphasis is on insulation, not noise reduction. But it ain't cheap. However, I'll likely use it on the closet rear/side curving wall, where I can't really use "board," and need a surface to glue the new carpet to (so I can't use something like Thinsulate batts). This time it's going to be light grey "hull liner" carpet, NOT deep midnight blue, "where the h-ck is ANYTHING in this dark pit of shag" color :D

5) There is also 1/2" extruded polystyrene. I'll use this on fridge side walls, and also the outside wall if I can (if wall behind fridge is flat enough - I think it will be. This is another case where I researched, basically comparing three "board" products: Extruded polystyrene vs. polyisocyanurate vs. expanded polystyrene. Extruded is the one I decided would be best (this is "blue board" "pink board," etc.). Expanded is clearly inferior (the beady white styrofoam), although still better than nothing for sure. Polyiso is often considered "best." But IIRC, I think it's better against cold than heat and heat is the main issue on the outside wall behind the refrigerator, so I decided on extruded polystyrene. Take that with a big "IIRC" on the details. At this point I remember my choices but am slightly foggy on the details of why, as you can tell.

_________________
1999 Concourse


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: 110 Volt Fridge
PostPosted: August 26th, 2017, 11:34 am 
Offline

Joined: August 8th, 2015, 11:54 am
Posts: 207
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Hey Blue - thanks for the info. I'm wanting to quiet the generator a bit but now my main concern is heat insulation. The company that makes Dynamat also makes something called DynaLiner which appears to be similar to the Armacell product. Its touted as being a closed cell foam that is a thermal and acoustic barrier. it comes in 1/8, 1/4 and 1/2 inch thicknesses and can be applied on top of Dynamat for increased sound reduction. I'm thinking that I would use Dynamat and DynaLiner inside the generator box, and just DynaLiner inside the outside wall, since its thin and flexible. I don't want to build up too thick of a layer of insulation inside the generator box as I'm concerned that it might affect air circulation inside the box, but again I'm not sure if that's a valid concern - just don't want to fry the generator. Around the fridge I'd go for closed cell foam panels, including one on top of the Dynamat/DynaLiner material.

Of course, without removing the generator I can only insulate the top and sides of the box but not the back or underneath it. In a perfect world, there would be a nice, permanently installed Honda generator in that box instead of Onan Ultra-Loud the rig came with. Oh well...

_________________
Paul Demarest
2003 Premier V-10


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: 110 Volt Fridge
PostPosted: August 26th, 2017, 3:51 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: July 31st, 2014, 1:01 am
Posts: 1914
Location: 1999 Concourse
I did use some Dynaliner last year. Buddy's cat peed on the cab carpet in his rig so we removed it. Went back with Dynamat on metal floor then Dynaliner then vinyl (vs. carpet). I didn't specifically compare it to Armacell for R-value but then he wanted noise abatement too in that case. If it's the same it's probably easier to get.

I only ever intended to insulate the "outside" of the generator box (meaning the sides of the box that are inside the living area). I see what you mean about that maybe holding heat in the generator box, but if the generator is depending on cooling istelf through my living room, no thanks! The door to the compartment has grilles and there's a fair amount of open air around it below. I didn't re-check just now, but at one time I read the installation instructinos and I don't remember them specifiying any top ventilation. And they are designed to be installed under the living area in motorhomes.

_________________
1999 Concourse


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: 110 Volt Fridge
PostPosted: August 27th, 2017, 11:30 am 
Offline

Joined: August 8th, 2015, 11:54 am
Posts: 207
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
When I pull the fridge out to insulate under it I'm going to also pull the carpet out of the small cabinet under the fridge so I can line that area too. Pulling the stove/oven out looks a little more complicated so I might just have to leave that for another time. The closet next to the fridge I but lined with carpet but as you've noted carpet doesn't do much for sound or heat insulation. When we ran the generator for about 6 hours to run the A/C I couldn't believe how hot it got inside of that closet. Getting the carpet out of that space looks pretty daunting so again this is a "when I get time" project.

_________________
Paul Demarest
2003 Premier V-10


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: 110 Volt Fridge
PostPosted: August 28th, 2017, 10:04 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: July 31st, 2014, 1:01 am
Posts: 1914
Location: 1999 Concourse
Speaking for my rig, and just FYI, it wasn't very hard to pull the oven/stove out. Here's how I remember it going:

1) Light burner and then turn off propane outside, to bleed lines. Turn off stove burner.

2) Lift up cooking grate surface, and under that is where you disconnect the propane line to the stove.

3) I forget how the stove was fastened to the cabinetry, but I don't remember it being difficult to figure out, so I think it was an obvious four perimeter screws or something like that.

Voila, oven removed. Mine just had the Attwood metal folding cover, not a Corian cover like in later years.

That said, none of the generator compartment is under there - it's all on the other side of the wall that separates the stove compartment from the refrigerator compartment.

On the other hand, as we've noted the gen box does extend into the closet. To really get at the whole thing, you need to remove the wall that separates the closet from the refrigerator. For me this was an obvious step, as I had it all apart anyway because I was completely re-doing the refrigerator space and taking out the MDF cabinetry (mostly because I dislike oak look). I will say that on my rig that closet/fridge septum wall was NOT well attached to the rig, so I was glad to be improving that. But if you are simply putting in a new fridge with no other reason to remove that wall? Yeah, I'd likely try to work around it. Maybe you can do the fridge section of the generator box and then reach under/through the door and do the closet section sort of separately. ON mine, the carpet came right off and then I just had a little work to get the adhesive off from under the pad, but not bad since I didn't have to worry about a fragile undersurface (was sturdy metal box).

_________________
1999 Concourse


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: 110 Volt Fridge
PostPosted: August 28th, 2017, 11:38 am 
Offline

Joined: August 8th, 2015, 11:54 am
Posts: 207
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Speaking of the Corian cover, my 2003 has the metal cover and I'd love to switch it to Corian since we seldom use the stove/oven. I've seen wood covers but I'd prefer Corian. Are these still available?

_________________
Paul Demarest
2003 Premier V-10


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: 110 Volt Fridge
PostPosted: August 28th, 2017, 12:52 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: July 31st, 2014, 1:01 am
Posts: 1914
Location: 1999 Concourse
I would think those were custom made when the Chinook was built. So probably not "available," but fabricatable. Since I used my stove about 50% of the time (and had the cover down the other 50%, I kind of liked the light metal one (can't imagine forgetting to put the heavy Corian one down), but I could see how the "seamless counter" of the Corian one could be nice.

Side note: I always knew Corian was heavy, but I couldn't believe how heavy *just* the stove counter surround was. And that was like three strips of 1.5" x 24" material (stove cutout was 95% of the area so there was not Corian there). It is nice though.

_________________
1999 Concourse


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: 110 Volt Fridge
PostPosted: August 31st, 2017, 2:21 pm 
Offline

Joined: August 8th, 2015, 11:54 am
Posts: 207
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Back on the fridge problem - I visited with fellow Chinooker Scott (also lives in the Santa Cruz area) and while discussing the fridge problem he showed me that there is a 2-3 inch gap between the top of the generator box and the bottom of the fridge compartment. Once I was laying down on the floor I could actually see some daylight showing through. The good news is that this will allow me to insert insulation in that gap to keep the generator from cooking the fridge without pulling the fridge out. One puzzle solved, more to go...

_________________
Paul Demarest
2003 Premier V-10


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: 110 Volt Fridge
PostPosted: September 2nd, 2017, 11:39 am 
Offline

Joined: August 8th, 2015, 11:54 am
Posts: 207
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Update on fridge performance. I figured I'd have to wait until my next trip up to the lake to test my repaired fridge but yesterday in hit 105 degrees here in Santa Cruz. Went out around 3:00 pm at the height of the heat to check the fridge. I hadn't opened any windows nor did I have the roof vent fans running as I usually would on a hot day at the lake so the interior of the rv was pretty hot as well. The freezer was at 12 degrees (as predicted by the service guy as the lowest temp possible on these large fridges 8.2 cubic feet) and 33 degrees inside the fridge.

I still plan on adding more insulation around the fridge itself and possible a fan in the old chimney but I'm really happy that the fridge is finally working properly - even under extreme conditions.

_________________
Paul Demarest
2003 Premier V-10


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 123 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13  Next

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group